Hand-colored Photographs of Japan from 1890s

Hand-colored Photographs of Japan from 1890s
International Photography Grant 2019

From the 12th century until 1868, Japan was ruled by successive feudal military shoguns who ruled in the name of the Emperor. Japan entered into a long period of isolation in the early 17th century, which was ended in 1853 when a United States fleet pressured Japan to open to the West. After nearly two decades of internal conflict and insurrection, the Imperial Court regained its political power in 1868 through the help of several clans from Chōshū and Satsuma—and the Empire of Japan was established. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, victories in the First Sino-Japanese War, the Russo-Japanese War and World War I allowed Japan to expand its empire during a period of increasing militarism. The Second Sino-Japanese War of 1937 expanded into part of World War II in 1941, which came to an end in 1945 following the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the Japanese surrender. Since adopting its revised constitution on May 3, 1947, during the occupation by the SCAP, Japan has maintained a unitary parliamentary constitutional monarchy with an Emperor and an elected legislature called the National Diet.

Photo: New York Public Library

Photo: New York Public Library

Photo: New York Public Library

Photo: New York Public Library

Photo: New York Public Library

Photo: New York Public Library

Photo: New York Public Library

Photo: New York Public Library

Photo: New York Public Library

Photo: New York Public Library

Photo: New York Public Library

Photo: New York Public Library

Photo: New York Public Library

Photo: New York Public Library

Photo: New York Public Library

Photo: New York Public Library

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International Photography Grant 2019